Saturday, 6 March 2010

Canon ion 251 review, part 2 (the camera)

Featuring a 200K pixel 1/2 inch CCD sensor with 100 ISO sensitivity, the Canon Ion 251 is a dated camera. At the time of it's launch in 1988, though, it was a unique product: A compact still image camera capable of recording images on 2 inch floppies.

It features an 11mm f/2.8 fixed focal lens, and shutter speeds range between 1/30 to 1/500 second. The field of view corresponds roughly to that of a normal lens. There is a built in flash on the front.

The top view shows most of the camera controls. From left: Compensation button for taking pictures against the sun, mode/erase button, a display indicating the frame number (1-50), yellow buttons for selecting the picture frame number.

The left of the two slider switches is also used as the main power button: "Lock" turns the camera off. "Play" is used to display pictures across the video output, while "Rec" is the picture taking mode.

The other slider switch is used to select the flash mode. Finally, there is the yellow shutter release button, and on the far right side of the lens is a macro selector.

The following picture shows the disk drive door open, with a grey two inch video floppy visible.
In the underside view, the tripod mount is visible. This is not the usual 1/4 inch tripod thread, however, but a smaller non-standard thread.
On the left side, there is a battery compartment, for the supplied rechargeable lead acid battery, or for the battery eliminator.

The camera dimensions are: 140mm wide, 115mm long, and 35mm high, making it a pretty pocketable camera, even by today's standards.

The viewfinder is disappointingly small, with a 7mm opening. It does feature a diopter adjustment.



>>>Go to part 3, in use

Go back to part 1, the contents

1 comment:

  1. Looks like a binocular and the quality picture it produce is a bit awful compared to what we have now.

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